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Terms for slides into and out of notes

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Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby Michael Good » Mon Jul 22, 2002 11:56 am

Are there generic names for sliding into a note from above, or sliding out of a note to a higher pitch?

In English, the term "scoop" seems fairly common for sliding into a note from below, and "fall-off" for sliding out of a note to a lower pitch. But slides from or to higher pitches seem less common, so the terminology also seems less standard. I've heard "doit" for sliding out of a note to a higher pitch, but not as commonly used as scoop and fall-off.

I'm looking for terms that are not specific to guitar bends, which have their own technical terminology.

We want to add support for these types of slides in the next version of MusicXML. So we need some names to use for them within MusicXML. If there's a good reference in this area, that would also be appreciated. The references we have here tend to be either classically oriented or guitar oriented, and not really on point to this question.

Thanks very much for any assistance you can offer!

Regards, Michael
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Re: Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby John Brenneise » Mon Jul 22, 2002 12:01 pm

Funny you should mention a slide ('just a little trombone humor here). I think you must be referring to a Glissando (sometimes abbreviated gliss.). Is that what you're looking for?

John



Are there generic names for sliding into a note from above, or sliding out of a note to a higher pitch?

In English, the term "scoop" seems fairly common for sliding into a note from below, and "fall-off" for sliding out of a note to a lower pitch. But slides from or to higher pitches seem less common, so the terminology also seems less standard. I've heard "doit" for sliding out of a note to a higher pitch, but not as commonly used as scoop and fall-off.

I'm looking for terms that are not specific to guitar bends, which have their own technical terminology.

We want to add support for these types of slides in the next version of MusicXML. So we need some names to use for them within MusicXML. If there's a good reference in this area, that would also be appreciated. The references we have here tend to be either classically oriented or guitar oriented, and not really on point to this question.

Thanks very much for any assistance you can offer!

Regards, Michael
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RE: Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby Michael Good » Mon Jul 22, 2002 12:22 pm

Slide and glissando are both used depending on the instrument. But in MusicXML we are reserving those terms for determinate glisses/slides between two notes.

Here we are looking for slides/glisses that are associated with a single note, with an interdeterminate starting or stopping point before or after the note.

I hope that clarifies what we are looking for - thanks!

Michael
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RE: Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby Paul Mindrup » Mon Jul 22, 2002 1:18 pm

I consulted my books on arrangement and found the term "rip" used to describe a downward slide into a note. I also encountered the term
"doit" - as you said, it means sliding up out of a note. I also found the term "flare" as a synonym for "scoop."

Of course, these are all glissandi, which is perhaps a more universally recognized name than any of the above. Is this term already used in MusicXML? Perhaps you could classify them all as glissandi, and use different attributes to differentiate between the variations.


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RE: Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby Michael Good » Mon Jul 22, 2002 1:23 pm

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for the reference. I have the Ross book but had missed that page. It's interesting to see he agrees with Read on the "plop" and "doit". But both Read and Ross are older books so I'm wondering how usage may have changed since then.

I've also asked this on the Finale list, and Chuck Israels confirmed that "doit" is still the common term for that articulation in his experience.

We are indeed planning to add these to the "articulations" element in MusicXML.

Anything you might find in your jazz improv texts would be most appreciated!

Thanks again, Michael
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RE: Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby Michael Good » Tue Jul 23, 2002 12:09 pm

Thanks, Paul. It's interesting that Read has "rip" and "lift" used as a synonym for what we are currently calling a "scoop", rather than as a synonym for "plop".

On the Finale list the votes have so far come in for "plop" and "kiss" in terms of current usage.

So far our initial proposal - scoop, fall-off, doit, and plop - seems to be OK. I know that whatever we pick, there will be communities that use other terms instead.

A glissando in MusicXML goes between two notes. While we could use attributes to indicate that there is no second note, it seems better to use separate articulation elements for these. I think this will make a better match with most existing music applications.

Further comments are most welcome!

Thanks again, Michael
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RE: Terms for slides into and out of notes

Postby Michael Good » Fri Jul 26, 2002 8:13 pm

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for this information and the references!

We're currently not planning to have separate elements for a drop vs. a spill, but rather use attributes to distinguish the different graphics like a straight vs. curved and regular vs. wavy lines.

Sometimes the terminology varies between rock, jazz, and classical genres, but here we are also seeing quite some variance within genres. Fortunately there's quite some overlap, too.

Thanks again, Michael
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